Is there room where you want to board?

By Kristina Pickering and Kaitlyn Angell

Is life in Doyle Hall for you?

By Kristina Pickering

Calling all residents! Students in Meletia, ever wonder what life in Doyle is like?

Doyle Hall is fairly quite, and residents tend to reserve our time for studying, and when we can, some good relaxation.

Doyle is a building practically made for science, nursing, and pharmacy majors.

One bonus of living in Doyle as a member of these majors is the close proximity to classes.

We are closest to our class buildings of Knott, UAB, Bunting, and for Morrissy’s Honors students, the Otenasak House.

This bonus makes for easier to get to a desired location with less travel time.
We are also closest to Doyle Dining Hall which means, when you need to eat in a hurry or eat and study, you have the time to do what you need to do.

However, sometimes that means we tend to be a lonelier group of students.

Though we hang out with our friends and homework buddies, we find that there are times where it is best that we stick to ourselves.

Our rooms, though tinier in size than Melitia, make the perfect intimate study area we need to focus.

Other amenities such as a laundry room on every floor and kitchens on the second and third floors also offer conveniences for residents.

These spaces also allow the possibility to meet new people such as are pharmacy students, education students or even our fellow undergrads.

We are challenged, however, to figure out how to cool our own rooms since we are only provided with a heater.

While inconvenient, this problem can be solved with a cold shower from our communal showers.

These showers are readily available and we do not have to clean them ourselves.
As a student who has lived in both dorms, I find myself torn between which building I find to be my favorite.

I would suggest, however, at least once, try living in Doyle Hall.

mel-doyle

A Melitia state of mind

By Kaitlyn Angell

Deciding where to board is essential to every college student. Location, laundry, and love all have the potential to make-or-break a school year.

According to the school’s timeline, in 1910, Meletia Hall, then College Hall, was constructed to provide not only housing, but also dining, classrooms, offices, laboratories, and even a library.

Today, Meletia Hall is an “all-women residence hall,” that includes a lobby, fireplace, and interfaith space, according to the NDMU Residence Life website.

Students can also utilize multiple kitchens, lounge spaces, and a single laundry room.
An interesting component of this dormitory is that the rooms vary greatly in size.

Sophomore Kelly Guerrero Portillo’s room, located on the third floor, is approximately 181 inches from the window to the door. A second-floor room on the elevator side, currently occupied by freshman Francessca David, is approximately 114 inches from one wall to the other.

Meletia is also closer to Gibbons than to Knott or UAB, unlike Doyle Hall.

Sophomore Marley rettschneider, current Doyle resident, remembers her time living in Meletia as “a bit more lively. Louder for sure,” she said.

“I enjoy living in Meletia … the building is quite old and that shows, but it is kept clean, so that’s a plus” freshman Alycia Hancok said.

One issue with the dorm is the laundry room remaining a nuisance, as seen in an earlier edition of Columns.

However a bonus to living in Melitia is the view that can be seen around the building. “I love the accessibility to nature. Being surrounded by nature makes me feel like I am in a close-knit community,” sophomore Cat Garcia said.

No matter which Hall an individual chooses, there will be benefits and downfalls.

Evaluating your personal needs and wants compared to the services offered in each building can help make the best decision.

 

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